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Criminal Mischief

In the state of Florida, criminal mischief is considered a property crime where one party causes damage to another person’s property. The types of damage associated with criminal mischief may vary and can include vandalism, destruction, graffiti, or other methods of vandalism.

If you or a loved one is facing charges for criminal mischief or vandalism, you need an experienced attorney to work with you to avoid hefty fines or jail time.  A criminal defense attorney can examine the facts of your case and develop a defense best suited to your circumstances. It would be beneficial to contact a defense attorney today to discuss your options.


Attorney for Criminal Mischief in Gainesville, Florida

At Galigani Law Firm, our criminal defense attorneys are prepared to defend you against these charges. If you were accused of criminal mischief or vandalism in Gainesville, Florida, you need to consult with an attorney to determine the best options for you.

Located six (6) minutes from the University of Florida’s Gainesville campus, Galigani Law Firm represents clients throughout Bradford County, Putnam County, Marion County, Gilchrist County, Union County, Levy County, and Columbia County.

Call Galigani Law Firm today at (352) 375-0812 to schedule your free consultation to discuss your charges.


Criminal Mischief Defined under Florida Law

Florida Statute §806.13 defines criminal mischief as a willful and malicious infliction of damage or injury to the personal or real property of another. Injury or damage may include graffiti or vandalism.

To convict an individual of criminal mischief, a prosecutor must show the following beyond a reasonable doubt:

  1. The injuries or damages were committed both maliciously and willfully;
  2. The defendant inflicted damages or injuries to personal or real property; and
  3. The damaged or injuries property belongs to the person named in the charging document.

Penalties for Criminal Mischief

Penalties for criminal mischief convictions vary based on the type of property damaged as well as the value of the damaged property. Florida Statute § 806.13(5) (a) states that if multiple properties owned by multiple parties are damaged or injured as a part of one act of criminal mischief, damages from said properties may be combined into one lump sum.

Penalties for criminal mischief are as follows: 

  1. For damages worth $1,000 or more, an actor is guilty of a third-degree felony carrying a maximum of five (5) years imprisonment and/or $5,000 in fines.
  2. For damages worth between $200 and $1,000, an actor is guilty of a first-degree misdemeanor carrying a maximum of 364 days in jail and/or $1,000 in fines; or
  3. For damages worth less than $200, an actor is guilty of a second-degree misdemeanor carrying a maximum of 60 days in jail and/or $500 in fines.

In the event that injured or damaged property was a place of worship, or housed religious articles or items, penalties will be heightened. For individuals with prior convictions, a criminal mischief charge will qualify as a third-degree felony regardless of the amount of damages. 


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Additional Resources

Arson and Criminal Mischief under §806.13- Visit the Online Sunshine website of the Florida State Legislature to find more information on arson and criminal mischief crimes. This website provides full statutes on criminal mischief, graffiti, vandalism, and other related property crimes. Also, find information on penalties for these offenses.


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Criminal Mischief Attorney in Gainesville, Florida

If you or a loved one finds yourself facing criminal mischief charges, call Galigani Law Firm at (352) 375-0812 today to speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney. With decades of combined experience defending clients like you, the attorneys at Galigani Law Firm are prepared to defend you against these charges.

Call Galigani Law Firm today to arrange your free consultation to discuss your options, possible legal strategies, and other valuable information which can help you defeat these charges.

This article was last updated on December 2, 2016.